RBN Energy

Sunday, 11/28/2021

Determining whether to approve plans for interstate natural gas pipeline projects has never been an easy task for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. There are so many things to consider, chief among them the need for the pipeline, impacts on the environment and landowners along the route, and what it all means for gas customers. But as complicated as the decision-making process may be, at least pipeline developers, gas producers, and customers knew that once a new pipeline was approved by FERC, permitted, built, and put into service that the matter was closed — that is, the pipeline was here to stay. Now, in the wake of a groundbreaking court ruling on a new gas pipeline near St. Louis, things are not so certain. As it turns out, we’re intimately familiar with the matter, having just made the case that the 65-mile Spire STL Pipeline is an important addition to the regional pipeline network that provides supply diversity, improved reliability, and access to lower-cost gas. In today’s RBN blog, we consider the evolution of FERC regulation of gas pipelines and the new uncertainty that all affected parties face.

Recently Published Reports

Report Title Published
NATGAS Billboard NATGAS Billboard - November 29, 2021 59 min 25 sec ago
Chart Toppers Chart Toppers - November 29, 2021 3 hours 15 min ago
NATGAS Permian NATGAS Permian - November 29, 2021 3 hours 37 min ago
U.S. Refinery Billboard U.S. Refinery Billboard - November 24, 2021 4 days 16 hours ago
Crude Gusher Crude Oil GUSHER - November 24, 2021 4 days 16 hours ago

Daily energy Posts

Wednesday, 11/17/2021

Energy marketeers are faced with a conundrum. Should the focus be on producing, processing, and marketing the hydrocarbon-based energy that the world needs today? Or is it time to go an entirely different direction toward net-zero emissions, renewables, and battery-powered everything? The answer, of course, is both. That means living, working, and producing hydrocarbon-based products in today's world while at the same time preparing for and investing in the world to which we’re headed. You might think of it as kind of a mild case of schizophrenia; we live in one reality, but we must think in terms of an entirely different future reality. That was a core theme for RBN’s Fall 2021 School of Energy: Hydrocarbon Markets in a Decarbonizing World. In today’s RBN advertorial blog, we provide our key findings and highlights from the conference curriculum.

Wednesday, 09/01/2021

Energy markets are red hot and are showing no signs of cooling off anytime soon. Natural gas prices have soared 20% to $ 4.615/MMbtu in just the last couple of weeks and could soon breach $5/MMBtu. In the NGL market, propane prices are up to $1.17/gal, the highest level for the month of September since 2011, with the possibility of shortages threatening domestic suppliers this winter. Even crude oil has continued to find support near the $70/bbl range, providing remarkable drilling and completion economics for well-positioned E&Ps. All these markets are data-intensive, and it can be a challenge to keep up with the most important developments. That’s what our ClusterX app is all about. It delivers to your phone or browser everything we believe is important as soon as the information hits RBN databases. And it is free! In today’s blog, we’ll look at some of the key capabilities of ClusterX, including a number of new features we’ve added.  Warning: Today’s blog is a blatant advertorial for ClusterX. 

Tuesday, 08/24/2021

Beginning in 2020 and so far through 2021, we at RBN have devoted a lot of our energy to covering the latest developments in environmental, social and governance (ESG) trends in the energy sector. That’s no accident – in fact, it’s been a necessity. As we recently discussed in Bullet the Blue Sky, environmentally focused initiatives have taken center-stage as society, investors, and governments demand higher standards from companies. The consequences to businesses that don’t heed the new paradigm could be dire for both their reputations and their pocketbooks. As a result, companies up and down the energy value chain have begun examining their operations to identify areas of improvement, particularly as it relates to their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In today’s blog, we’ll focus on one of the most significant of GHGs – methane. We will look at what’s being done to monitor and address those emissions, and how companies may ultimately benefit by reining them in.